Suspension in brown spirits

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Re: Suspension in brown spirits

Postby coffe addict » Fri Feb 08, 2019 9:35 am

Agreed Sam, they shouldn't even be referred to as distilleries imo :angry-banghead:
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Re: Suspension in brown spirits

Postby scythe » Fri Feb 08, 2019 2:10 pm

My reason for 35% was to see if it was louching due to oils some how, if it got worse at lower %ABV then thats what it would be.
If it was still there at 45%ABV then it would be proteins.
35% + 45% = 40% overall when your done.
Last edited by scythe on Fri Feb 08, 2019 2:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Suspension in brown spirits

Postby db1979 » Fri Feb 08, 2019 3:30 pm

scythe wrote:My reason for 35% was to see if it was louching due to oils some how, if it got worse at lower %ABV then thats what it would be.
If it was still there at 45%ABV then it would be proteins.
35% + 45% = 40% overall when your done.

45 % may not even tell you for certain, it's a good approach though. No harm in making small dilutions from barrel strength down to see what is the cut off for louching. If it turns out to be 55 % and you don't want it that strong then you can always dilute further but can't make it more concentrated.
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Re: Suspension in brown spirits

Postby Fishws » Wed Feb 13, 2019 1:28 pm

ed9362 wrote:i did a quick search and below came from a distillery in the USA

What’s that stuff in my whiskey!?
by Guy | posted in: Whiskey | 2
We get the occasional inquiry from people who have purchased a bottle of our whiskey (and other barrel aged spirits) and have found a hazy cloud floating or sunk in the bottom of the bottle (see video below). Don’t panic, what you’re seeing is flavor!
During the fermentation, distilling and oak maturation processes various phenols and esters are produced. These components make up a lot of the flavors we enjoy in whiskey. The large volume producers use chill filtering to remove the visible components. Why? because it makes the product look pretty, it is strictly for cosmetic reasons that they do this although it also takes away some flavor and mouth-feel from the product. Chill filtering in whiskey production has been a common practice for most of the last century although the big producers still occasionally release smaller batch products without chill filtering.
While we do filter out wood particles from the barrels, we do not employ chill filtering at Great Lakes Distillery. We want to provide our product to consumers with the maximum flavor of the whiskey as it came from the barrel. Don’t like how it looks in the bottle? Simply shake the bottle twice and these flavor components will be dispersed.


That’s very helpful mate, thanks.
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Re: Suspension in brown spirits

Postby Fishws » Wed Feb 13, 2019 1:35 pm

Sam. wrote:
db1979 wrote:
southern45 wrote:Not bad for a distillery who buy in ALL their wash from a big name brewery.......

:handgestures-thumbdown: much of the craft comes from fermentation, especially if it's all-grain. Maybe there needs to be different categories for these types of awards, one for distillers that also ferment, and one for those that don't.


No different to gin distilleries that buy in their nuetrel spirit....


Exactly Sam, and most do buy in their base spirit, even the bespoke, expensive, small batch distillers. I run a small distillery (Grumpy Fish) and I see the production of a high quality base spirit as being fundamental to the distiller’s art. High-quality gin should be about two things - base spirit and botanicals. Very few seem to give a shit about the importance of producing your own base spirit.

I could reduce costs by around 30-40% if I bought in base spirit but I think this is contrary to the principles of small-batch, high quality gin. I reckon it’s not going to be long before we see consumers wising up to this.

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Re: Suspension in brown spirits

Postby Sam. » Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:44 pm

Just googled your distillery fish, looks good.

I noticed your attached with a winery? Do you ferment your own grapes to make your product or do you take wine already produced to make nuetrel?
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Re: Suspension in brown spirits

Postby Fishws » Sat Feb 16, 2019 12:37 am

Sam. wrote:Just googled your distillery fish, looks good.

I noticed your attached with a winery? Do you ferment your own grapes to make your product or do you take wine already produced to make nuetrel?


Sam, we do a bit of both but mostly use wine that cannot otherwise be used.
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